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Night-Herons and other nocturnal birding in southern Florida

Alex Lamoreaux|

If we weren’t too exhausted from full days of birding, my friends and I tried to search for snakes, lizards, frogs, and any other herps would could find after dark during our 10 day trip through Florida. It was often too cold or too windy to really find much of anything, but we did come across quite a few birds while we were out wandering around in the dark. One evening, while we were searching for herps around the Flamingo marina in the Everglades, we had a really great time (eBird list) with an Eastern Screech-Owl and a Barred Owl calling in the distance, while a Black-crowned Night-Heron was foraging around the docks at the marina. We also found a Laughing Gull and an injured Common Loon nearby. Two nights later, when we made it down onto the keys and to our friend Mark’s house, a ‘Great White” Heron and an adult Yellow-crowned Night-Heron welcomed us, as they foraged in the shallow water near the road (eBird list). Obviously it is well-known that night-herons do most of their foraging at night, but it was really neat to see the ‘Great White’ Heron out too.

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron on Big Pine Key, Florida. (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron on Big Pine Key, Florida. (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

'Great White' Heron on Big Pine Key, Florida. (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

‘Great White’ Heron on Big Pine Key, Florida. (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

Black-crowned Night-Heron hunting for fish around the marina at Flamingo. (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

Black-crowned Night-Heron hunting for fish around the marina at Flamingo. (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

An injured Common Loon that we found in Flamingo. (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

An injured Common Loon that we found in Flamingo. (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

A Laughing Gull at the Flamingo marina. (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

A Laughing Gull at the Flamingo marina. (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

About the Author

Alex Lamoreaux

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Alex Lamoreaux has been an avid birder and naturalist since he was a youngster, growing up exploring the farmland and Appalachian ridges near Hershey, Pennsylvania. He attended Penn State University, studying wildlife biology. Alex has traveled extensively throughout North America, Central America, and South Africa and is a freelance nature tour guide, field biologist, and wildlife photographer. Alex has worked on wildlife research projects ranging from Whimbrel migration along the coast of Virginia to Yellow-billed Cuckoo nesting in the desert southwest. He has been the migration counter at the Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory for the past two fall seasons, documenting the massive visible migration of raptors and songbirds along Lake Superior. Alex loves to share his knowledge of nature, and strives to bring the birding community together to share in the fun that studying birds and wildlife has to offer. He has helped to organize and coordinate birding events in his home state of Pennsylvania and beyond. Contact Info Alex Lamoreaux aslamoreaux@gmail.com (717) 943-7086

  • I love the water reflections on the the herons.

  • Great post! Enjoyed these night views!

  • Gregg L. Friedman MD

    Great Article and photos. Thanks for posting it. 5 Stars. By Gregg L. Friedman MD