East coast migration was on!

Drew Weber|

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Regional Overview

For the third night in a row, migration was good across much of the region. The entire east coast lit up with heavy migration as clear skies and south winds combined to create excellent migration conditions. There should be a lot of turnover in species as good conditions prevailed to the north and south of the region. As noted before, the bulk of migrants in many areas should still be sparrows but the excitement from this mid-April push will be in the scattered warblers that arrive early, such as Northern Parula, Black-and-white, Nashville and Yellow Warblers. Keep an eye out for these. Other than warblers and sparrows, this big influx should also bring an increase in shorebirds, waders and terns. South winds will bring another good push of raptors, particularly Broad-winged Hawks as we hit their peak migration. Keep an eye to the skies to pick them up anywhere.

Pennsylvania

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Birds were moving fast in a NNE direction across the entire state. I would expect a lot of changeover with new species moving in across the state. With no precipitation, concentrations should be at traditional hotspots, so start by checking those first.

As always, please leave me comments on what you find out in the field.

Check out Alex’s post for an idea of birds to be expecting in the next week.

Maryland

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The Maryland/Washington DC radar is new for the site. This will show how birds are moving to the south of PA to give an indication of birds moving into the state, as well as give an indication of  the previous nights migration to Maryland birders. Birds were moving fast to the north across the entire state. I would expect a lot of changeover with new species moving in across the state. With no precipitation, concentrations should be at traditional hotspots, so start by checking those first.

New York

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New York was the only spot showing precipitation in the east. Birds were moving fast in a NNE direction across the entire state. Birding locations in the Adirondacks may see some higher concentrations along the line of storms that passed through overnight. In general,  expect a lot of changeover with new species moving in across the state. Where there was no precipitation, concentrations should be at traditional hotspots, so start by checking those first.

Ohio

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Migration was also roaring through Ohio. Birds could be piling up along the lake as they continued to fly through the region into the early morning hours.

Check Kenn Kaufman’s blog for more specifics on what to expect this time of year.

For migration updates or other regions check-
New England – Tom Auer’s blog
New Jersey – Woodcreeper by David La Puma
Florida/SE – Badbirdz Reloaded by Angel and Mariel Abreu
NW Ohio – Birding the Crane Creek by Kenn Kaufman
Wisconsin – Woodcreeper by David La Puma
Pac NW – Birds Over Portland by Greg Haworth

I need your help! These reports will only be as good as the feedback I get on these updates. Please leave comments on interesting patterns of migration you are seeing in the field so I can incorporate some ground truthing to my forecasts and predictions. Thanks!

 

About the Author

Drew Weber

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Drew is the founder and editor of Nemesis Bird and now works to curate some of the best content the web has to offer on birding and ornithology from an energetic crew of ornithologists, field researchers, tour leaders and photographers. Drew is originally from PA but now lives in central New York where he is enjoying the long and snowy winters. He has done various bird jobs including bird surveys for the 2nd PA Breeding Bird Atlas, tracked saw-whet owls from dusk to dawn with Scott Weidensaul and counted hawks for several years for Hawk Mountain Sanctuary. Drew is an avid lister, especially on smaller scales, and enjoys adding new birds to county, state and life lists. He also enjoys digiscoping and making apps for birders. He is Project Coordinator for the Merlin Project at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. He is also project manager for the North American Rare Bird Alert.