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Photo Study: Stilt Sandpiper @ Conejohela Flats

Alex Lamoreaux|

Recently I posted about a morning I spent birding at Conejohela Flats in Lancaster County, which mentioned that I saw and photographed an adult Stilt Sandpiper. That morning I was incredibly lucky because the bird actually flew over and landed where I was already set up and taking pictures of some Black Terns. Lighting conditions were really in my favor and I was able to take a ton of photos of the sandpiper as it foraged and preened itself. Below are some of my favorite shots. Of all the shorebirds I have seen, Stilt Sandpipers are certainly one of my favorites.

Stilt Sandpiper – Adult at Conejohela Flats, PA (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

Stilt Sandpiper – Adult at Conejohela Flats, PA (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

Stilt Sandpiper – Adult at Conejohela Flats, PA (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

Stilt Sandpiper – Adult at Conejohela Flats, PA (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

Stilt Sandpiper – Adult at Conejohela Flats, PA (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

Stilt Sandpiper – Adult at Conejohela Flats, PA (Photo by Alex Lamoreaux)

About the Author

Alex Lamoreaux

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Alex Lamoreaux has been an avid birder and naturalist since he was a youngster, growing up exploring the farmland and Appalachian ridges near Hershey, Pennsylvania. He attended Penn State University, studying wildlife biology. Alex has traveled extensively throughout North America, Central America, and South Africa and is a freelance nature tour guide, field biologist, and wildlife photographer. Alex has worked on wildlife research projects ranging from Whimbrel migration along the coast of Virginia to Yellow-billed Cuckoo nesting in the desert southwest. He has been the migration counter at the Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory for the past two fall seasons, documenting the massive visible migration of raptors and songbirds along Lake Superior. Alex loves to share his knowledge of nature, and strives to bring the birding community together to share in the fun that studying birds and wildlife has to offer. He has helped to organize and coordinate birding events in his home state of Pennsylvania and beyond. Contact Info Alex Lamoreaux aslamoreaux@gmail.com (717) 943-7086

  • Very nice! As classy as a black and white movie

  • Maria Firpi

    Very descriptive series.

  • These are great! It is definitely molting a lot and is halfway between striking breeding plumage and drabber non-breeding. I like how shorebirds have such strikingly different feathers like this because it makes it really easy to tell which feathers are which when they are migrating through.